• Is the proposal aligned with the goals of the program?
  • Does the proposal provide clear, strategic thought in describing the problem and the solution?
  • Does the proposal clearly demonstrate that they have a viable solution that will have clinical impact (within 1-3 year timeframe)?
  • Is there direct and active participation of clinicians in the development, implementation, and adoption into the clinical workflow?
  • Are the PI(s) and collaborators well suited to the project? If established, what is their record of accomplishments? Do they have a clear and compelling history of working with others to achieve clinical impact?
  • Is the institutional support, resources, equipment, and other physical resources available to the investigators adequate for the project proposed?

Criteria to assess significant clinical impact:

  • Access to clinical data is essential for creation and assessment of decision support tools.
  • Partnerships with active clinicians with substantial patient caseloads is needed for both the initial determination of feasibility (is the needed data available for patients?) and the longer-term demonstration of accuracy and utility through retrospective and prospective clinical trials.
  • Scalability – the technology needs to be something easily adaptable and expandable.
  • How will the project change existing standards of cancer care?
  • How will the work translate to clinical use/patient care?